About your Search

20130129
20130206
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5
malnutrition, the mortality of this disease, depending on the variation of protein energy malnutrition that we see, can be as high as 30 to 50%. usually the children die from routine infections like diarrhea or pneumonia. in fact, pneumonia is the most common cause of death. children who are severely malnourished appear anorexic. they do not want to eat. they're often very depressed. their heads are low. they stop talking. they stop walking, and they're severely dehydrated and suffering from infectious diseases. perhaps the most extreme case of malnutrition the team witnessed was annis-- a tiny wisp of a girl, two and a half years old. annis is just skin and bones and a head. and i looked at her, and i looked at the weight, and i asked the mother how old she is and the mother told me. and i said, "it's not possible." so i took annis myself back to weigh. i saw the scale, it said 4.2 kilos, took annis off, measured her height, put her back on the scale. i still couldn't believe it. it was amazing to me that annis was still alive. the highest mortality for children so severely malnourished occur
the idea how energy relates to these things. it's the knowing how hot-- how much energy is gonna flow. and we get that idea. we make these distinctions. you guys know when you go on the top of the mountains, it's cold up there. but you're closer to the sun, right? in the top of the mountains, it's cold. and somebody say, "hey, how come it's so cold up here?" so--we're closer to the sun. wait, no, no, no. that should make us hotter. you guys know when you're approaching the sun, it gets hotter and hotter, don't you? have you known that? i mean, you can get in the best ceramic materials that the humans can make. you get within a million miles of that sun. honey, you're gonna fry to a crisp, a million miles from the sun, unless you go at nighttime. [laughter] hey, but the point, back again, you're up at the top of the hill and it's cool up there. and you know what you can tell your friends? hey, gang, you know why it's so cool up here? because warm air rises. let me ask you a question, does warm air rise? you guys know about that from before? did you guys know that you get in the top of
harnessing all other kinds of energy. during that long block of time from a couple of million years ago until the industrial revolution, there was a point about 10,000 years ago when human beings began to farm, began to practice agriculture, and that harnessed a lot more energy than was possible by just hunting and gathering wild resources. keach: in the old world, we know that agriculture sparked the development of the world's first cities in places like sumer in ancient mesopotamia. but how did farming begin in the new world ? when scotty macneish first came to the tehuacan valley in 1962, he was seeking the answer to one simple question -- did agriculture evolve here or was it introduced from the old world ? then we'll measure out from the corners. keach: in a stratum of the purron cave that had been laid down thousands of years later than those in which he found the hunters and gatherers, macneish made a discovery that exceeded all expectations. macneish: this is a corn cob, and it's a real little one. keach: it may have looked insignificant, but the shriveled ear dated to about 5000 b.c.
expand all of our energy pushing for immigration reform while we know our communities are continuing to be separated, and really do to a flawed system. >> very quickly, can you tell us your own story, how you came to the u.s. and became to be a dreamer activist? >> i came to the u.s. -- actually, i lost my right leg when i was 2.5 while in peru. because of medical reasons, my treatment was in the united states at shriners hospital. my parents decided to move when i was 10 years old. i found out i was undocumented when i was graduating from high school and wanting to pursue higher education. i really got involved in the trina movement -- i think is a miracle. i consider myself to be very privileged for being a to speak out on these issues, but also to be part of a beautiful and powerful community. what the dreamer community did for me is allow me to reclaim my identity. it reminded me being undocumented is not something to be ashamed of, but to the crowd. and we ultimately define our identity and our ability to reflect change. i eventually in 2010 was very frustrated by the lack of co
energy should come to this state, leading the world, we should be fossil-free by 2030. we can do that with our help. we will help you get there. we will help the president. but we will cream you if you opened at new york state to fracking. >> direct actions are continuing against the keystone xl pipeline that would direct tar sands oil from canada to the gulf coast. on monday, an oklahoma woman temporarily halted construction on the pipeline by chaining her neck to an excavator. she was arrested following her act of protest. president obama has delayed a decision on the keystone pipeline until the spring. he initially postponed until after the presidential election. those are some of the headlines. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman with nermeen shaikh. >> welcome to all our listeners and viewers from around the country and around the world. the obama administration's into a legal justification for assassinating u.s. citizens without charge had been revealed for the first line. according to a secret justice department document de
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)